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About Us FAQ FAQ

FAQ Categories: Buying | Performance | Playing | Manufacturing | Warranty


1. Are Henselite bowls Australian made?

Henselite is the only trusted and innovative Australian lawn bowls manufacturer with over 80 years of experience. 

Henselite is an Australian owned company and all our lawn bowls are manufactured in Melbourne, Australia. We are proud to be part of the Australian Made campaign which recognises Australian products which have been locally manufactured to our high quality standards.
 

2. Does the legal bias of a bowl last the duration of the stamp?

We suggest competitive bowlers get their bowls checked regularly as wear on the running surface of the bowl can straighten the run of the bowl.The legal bias of a bowl is subject to the original narrowness of the bias, its use and the condition of the greens where they are used. There is very little safety margin in the bias of the narrowest legal biased bowls and it is possible the bias may become illegal because of wear.

3. How does the bias work?

The bowls are shaped so that the widest part of the running surface is off centre. Therefore the bias of the bowl is produced by the rate at which the bowl 'falls' to the smaller or lower side.

Old wooden bowls sometimes had lead weights in them to assist with making the bowl heavy enough and to assist with bias. However, in those days each bowl in a set was numbered so that the owner knew how much grass to take with each bowl. (Grass: degree of angle off centre that a bowler directs their bowl in order for it to finish up in the desired position on the green.)
 

4. Does the legal bias of a bowl last the duration of the stamp?

Subject to the narrowness of the bowl, its use and condition of greens where they are used. There is very little safety margin in the bias of the narrowest legal biased bowls and the chances are the bias may only be legal for 2-3 years because of wear. We suggest competitive bowlers get their bowls checked regularly as wear on the running surface of the bowl will straighten the run of the bowl.
 

5. What does the date stamp mean?

World Bowls requires that licensed manufacturers and licensed testers put the registered 'World Bowls Stamp ' either on the small end or between the inner and outer rings of the bowl. This stamp validates that the bowl complies with all the regulations and specifications of World Bowls. Introduced in 2002 the stamp is now used on all new and re-tested bowls.

The stamp is a requirement for the bowls to be valid for use in major competitions under the control of World Bowls or any Member National Authority.

Prior to the 2002 introduction of the World Bowls stamp, bowls were stamped with the stamps of the International Bowling Board and prior to 1988 bowls had the stamp of the major countries.

6. Do bowls have to be tested?

In the past that was the case but today, there is no need for testing bowls unless they are being used in major events such as state titles or international events or as nominated in the entry form.
 

7. What does the map of Australia mean on older bowls?

This was the official stamp of the Australian Bowls Council, the controlling body in Australia because the bias standard was greater than that of the International Bowls Board (IBB). IBB is now called World Bowls (WB). The Australian stamp was dropped in 1993 when all bowls were stamped with the oval WB stamp which is now stamped on all bowls. The stamp still has a 10 year duration.
 

8. Is there a difference between black and coloured bowls?

Yes. Black is harder, more wear-resistant and more colour stable. Coloured bowls are made from a different material.